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/tg/ - Traditional Games


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[ERROR] No.31730092 [DELETED]  [Reply] [Original] [4plebs] [archived.moe]

The reason we cringe at the sound of nails on a chalkboard is because it closely mimics the noise of something we used to fear.

Whatever it was has long since departed this world.

The only evidence we have that it ever existed is the sensation we still get when we hear the noise.

>> No.31730187

There is a natural fear in darkness. It makes sense, your primary sense for detecting danger is deprived. It becomes much harder to map your surroundings for things to avoid. And that makes us uncomfortable. We are a product of out heritage.

Now we also have an instinctive fear of fire. And although fire can certainly be dangerous it is nowhere near as fundamentally impairing as darkness. Something in the deep past must have taught us something mind shatteringly horrible about fire. And yet we make fire to banish darkness all the time...

>> No.31730266

>>31730187
Pretty sure our fear of fire is learned, as you notice a lot of kids don't have an instinctive fear of it until they touch it for the first time or understand the danger of getting burned.

>> No.31730271

Smells like /x/.

>> No.31730315

>>31730187
>Something in the deep past must have taught us something mind shatteringly horrible about fire
FIRE BAD

>> No.31730351

>>31730266
Yeah, we actually have a complex set of responses to fire that include both attraction and repulsion.

>>31730092
Actually it's because our ears are particularly responsive to that frequency range and it's physically painful for our ears to be hearing it.

>> No.31730371

>>31730351
I think it's called having a crush.

And on the chalkboard thing, I'd heard it's a similar frequency to lots of primate alarm calls

>> No.31730396

>>31730371
>And on the chalkboard thing, I'd heard it's a similar frequency to lots of primate alarm calls
Yeah, that was some retarded folks' wild conjecture based on nothing. It's since been disproved. It's sounds in the range of 2000 to 4000 Hz. They hurt your ears. That's all it is.

>> No.31730439

>>31730092
>The reason we cringe at the sound of nails on a chalkboard

Is because its so high pitched it irritates our ear drums.

>> No.31730485

>>31730092
Throughout all of history, all ultimately useless generated by intelligence agencies- from the CIA to the temple guards of Uruk- has accumulated in a single small server farm in France. Who is doing this? How? And what do they want with so much irrelevant information?

Nobody has actually manufactured a nuclear weapon since the sixties. Since the Cuban Missile Crisis, all nukes have actually been made out of the public's fear of nukes, condensed and refined. Since the end of the Cold War, all of the nuclear weapons in the world have been slowly fading away.
There are elements in each of the nuclear power's militaries who are planning on doing something... drastic about this.

Culture, language, tool use- these can be considered the win condition of evolution, because they render natural selection obsolete.
What, then, is the win condition of civilization?

>>31730439
>>31730396
>>31730371
>>31730351
>>31730266
ITT: people missing the point

>> No.31730512

>>31730485
Ultimately useless information, I mean.

>> No.31730517

>>31730485
>ITT: people missing the point
This.

Come on, people, you've got someone giving you plot hooks for modern-settng horror. Why you so stubborn, teegee?

>> No.31730529

>>31730485
>ITT: people missing the point

No, you just started a thread with shitty fucking ideas.

And continue to peddle dumb ideas.

>> No.31730532

>>31730485
I doubt they're missing the point. They're just not into wilful ignorance.

>> No.31730535

>>31730485

>Natural selection rendered obsolete

I don't think you realize what that means.

>> No.31730545

>>31730517

Because they're bad, lackluster ideas that go "THIS REGULAR THING IS SPOOKY. BE SPOOKED!"

Show some fucking effort.

>> No.31730593 [DELETED] 

>>31730545
Not that guy but he seemed showed far more effort than you.

>> No.31730616

Ever noticed how many people are taking drugs these days? Antidepressants, anti-anxiety pills, contraceptives, antibiotics? It turns out the human body doesn't metabolise drugs entirely before they leave the system. Our sewers, rivers, and oceans are slowly becoming a chemical cocktail with unpredictable effects. What horrors will arise from the depths? And what will happen to humans exposed to it?

>> No.31730617

>>31730593

Showing effort doesn't mean shit if your effort doesn't actually amount to anything.

>> No.31730627

>>31730545
Not that guy but he seemed to show far more effort than you.

/tg/ used to be good at this sort of thing, I agree. But I'd venture to guess that fedoras like you are more part of the problem than the solution.

>> No.31730646

>>31730616

This isn't a horror plot. It's a real thing. Kidneys can't break down all the meds, and were never intended to, and water purification can't do that either, so all the fishes are getting huge doses of antidepressants as we speak. IIRC the main results are gay fish.

>> No.31730658

>>31730617
It amounts to more than showing none at all. You're the janitor yelling at NASA for taking too long to put a man on the moon.

>> No.31730661

>>31730627

"Do it better yourself" is a shitty argument, and you should feel shit for it. Also, I'm terribly sorry for not getting all excited for lackluster ideas.

>> No.31730669

>>31730485
Everybody knows about the launch site at Cape Canaveral, operated by NASA and situated to launch things into an equatorial orbit. Fewer people know about Vandenburg Air Force Base, operated by the Air Force and situated to launch things into polar orbits.
Nobody knows about Masada, operated by a nameless agency and situated to launch things on orbits which take them deep beneath the earth.
>>31730529
Not OP.
>>31730535
In my defense, I'm not trying for scientific accuracy.
>>31730646
It might also be lowering fertility rates in people as well.

>> No.31730673 [DELETED] 

>>31730669

>In my defense, I'm not trying for scientific accuracy.

Yeah, I know. It's just an intresting thing that's actually happening.

>> No.31730675

>>31730646
So make them gay dolphins instead. If that's not scary I don't know what is.

>> No.31730676

>>31730545
Okay, why don't you start?

>> No.31730681

There is a small fraction of the human population that is color blind in 2 ways, reversing green and red. It could be you. Thing is, they will never know, green just means red to them and red means green. They would get thoroughly confused if you reversed their double impairment back to normal red and normal green.

>> No.31730703

>>31730676

>>31730676

Because I actually know my limitations and the fact that I wouldn't be bringing in anything intresting or new. I'm not showing effort, because the effort I would show wouldn't satisfy even men.

And no. That doesn't mean I can't call shit shit when I see it.

>> No.31730704

>>31730627
I think the best kind of horror is the one where something seemingly normal turns out to be completely different what you expected. Mundane things being part of some nefarious plot are scary, since it could happen to you (unlike zombie infestations and so on).

>> No.31730710

>>31730661
>"Do it better yourself" is a shitty argument

Only if you're buying a product made by professionals. If you're getting something for free among peers, you are indeed the weakest link for not adhering to the "put up or shut up" principle.

I haven't contributed the ideas being brainstormed but neither am I shitting on people for trying. The fact that you feel you have to in order to justify your unwillingness to try just makes you pathetic.

>> No.31730718

>>31730703
Alright you can stop reading the thread then, your participation is no longer required. Thanks for your input, anon!

>> No.31730737

>>31730545
Then you don't understand what Carcosa is about.

It is not, never has been asbout "horror" or "scary" or "vague threats and impossible angles."

Carcosa is the flip side of sanity. It's where reality doesn't fit into the nice little rules, the orderly explanations. It's where it's not fear, terror, or horror. It's about the cracks in the sidewalk being the opening to the slippery slope down which pennies and pocketknives fall to end up in the hands of a stranger with your fingerprints on them, prompting a police call in the middle of the night to ask you to come to the house of your best friend, who's girlfriend has been hideously murdered, where you find your clean and unbloodied pocketknife on his endtable

Carcfosa isn't fear. Carcosa is where fear takes a back seat to the unpleasant realization that things are wrong, and you don't know what it exactly is or why, but you can only fall deeper into the abyss until you understand it.

And then you understand it, and you're fucked, because you did it to yourself by accident.

>> No.31730740

>>31730681

I'm not really sure about the implications of that or why it would be spooky, but that's actually similar to some things that exist in the real world. Synesthesia is a rare condition that you're born with, in which a person actually perceives everything as colors. Hearing, taste, smell, touch are all colors. It's impossible to comprehend for anyone not actually having it, and people who have it tend to be incredibly frustrated with the fact that others can't really understand their perspective on things.

>> No.31730743

>>31730703
>And no. That doesn't mean I can't call shit shit when I see it.

Actually it does. If you know you can't do better and you're not even willing to submit yourself to peer scrutiny, you should probably just remove yourself from the discussion while others continue working at it.

>> No.31730764

>>31730669
The Eastern and Western Lights, also known as the aurora oriental and the aurora occidental, are some of the most beautiful natural phenomena on earth, and take place in areas where millions of people would see them each day.
Why, then, does nobody know they exist? It's been captured and camera on television. Their effects on the magnetosphere have been measured. People react to them while they're happening. But nobody remembers seeing them.
>>31730743
Hey. I can't paint for shit, but that doesn't mean I can't recognize bad art when I see it.

>> No.31730767

>>31730737
I thought Carcosa was about making Magic Users rape adolescent girls to death every time they cast a spell?

>> No.31730772

>>31730737
>Carcosa is the flip side of sanity. It's where reality doesn't fit into the nice little rules, the orderly explanations. It's where it's not fear, terror, or horror. It's about the cracks in the sidewalk being the opening to the slippery slope down which pennies and pocketknives fall to end up in the hands of a stranger with your fingerprints on them, prompting a police call in the middle of the night to ask you to come to the house of your best friend, who's girlfriend has been hideously murdered, where you find your clean and unbloodied pocketknife on his endtable

I... what?

>> No.31730776

While I don't have any ideas of my own, here's a whole PDF full of them I grabbed from a share thread.

>> No.31730793

>>31730767
He missed the point too.

>> No.31730809

>>31730772
Yes, exactly.

>> No.31730820

>>31730776
I wanted to post this, but someone beat me to it:
>>31729670

>> No.31730821

>>31730776
Thank you based anon!

>> No.31730825

>>31730772

He doesn't really know what he's talking about, but is really trying hard.

He's trying to make the point that Carcosa and Lovecraftian horror and whatnot are not about the fact that there's something out there that might kill you, but the very simple fact that there *is* something out there, and that means that your perception of reality is fundamentally wrong.

This is why, say, most popular culture depictions of Cthulhu fail horribly. They always try to portray it as this horrible cosmic menace that will kill everything, and killing everything is the main point why it's bad. Whereas in the original story, Cthulhu even existing was a horrible, incomprehensible thing that killed people out of sheer maddening horror.

>> No.31730828

>>31730764
Only if you offer constructive criticism, otherwise you're just shitposting.

For example, >>31730266 is a good example of criticism that adds to the discussion instead of merely acting juvenile.

>> No.31730832

>>31730809
No, not exactly.

He's baffled at how fucking dumb that idea is like I am.

>> No.31730858

>>31730825
I heard it best summed up as follows:

>See, Lovecraft's stories haven't remained popular so long just because his monsters are scary. They endure because his monsters are metaphors for existential alienation. It's not the appearance of the monsters in his stories, it's the reality of them, the fact that they exist. Their existence alone proves that humanity is doomed and that all our hopes and dreams are stupid. Running into one of Lovecraft's Elder Gods is like finding a strange pair of underwear in your bed and realizing that your spouse is cheating on you. It's not the underwear itself that's stabbing you in the heart; it's the betrayal it represents. Lovecraft's monsters are proof to the protagonist that the universe is not benevolent. Finding strange underwear might mean that your spouse never loved you; stumbling upon a Lovecraft creature means that God never loved you.

>> No.31730862

>>31730825

As one Lackluster writer put it:
>Running into one of Lovecraft's Elder Gods is like finding a strange pair of underwear in your bed and realizing that your spouse is cheating on you. It's not the underwear itself that's stabbing you in the heart; it's the betrayal it represents. Lovecraft's monsters are proof to the protagonist that the universe is not benevolent. Finding strange underwear might mean that your spouse never loved you; stumbling upon a Lovecraft creature means that God never loved you.

Cracked's usually lackluster, but I rather liked that one.

>> No.31730878

>>31730858
>>31730862

Crackedmind

>> No.31730879

>>31730832
>>31730772
Good lord, go and actually READ The King in Yellow

>> No.31730941

>>31730858

I prefer how Yahtzee summarized it in one of his youtube videos.

The universe is big and uncaring, humanity doesn't matter and neither do you, and what is out there and what will take our place will be vastly superior and completely incomprehensible.

>> No.31730960

>>31730941

It's not about superiority, though. It's more like the whole universe is infinitely shittier than you could have imagined, before your feeble reality was shattered by seeing a Shoggoth eat your best friend.

>> No.31730981

>>31730960

Well the idea wasn't so much superiority of other things but rather your own insignificance.

You could call the total perspective vortex a lovecraftian horror machine.

>> No.31730983

>>31730879
I'm aware of Ambrose Bierce the same way I'm aware of your stupidity, I read it already.

>> No.31731000

>>31730187

It's more that as bad as the fire vampires were they were better than the darkness skeletons

The black board jabberwockies were just annoying really.

>> No.31731011

>>31730960
This is part of the problem I had with Laundry Files.

Why do I have to roll sanity if I've already called an artillery strike on the shoggoth?

Not so scary now, bitch.

Really, I don't think Lovecraftian horror is suited for tabletop at all. PCs cannot really be that insignificant.

>> No.31731052

>>31731011

Well, there's still the fact that the Shoggoth existed, and came from somewhere. And that "somewhere" is outside all your comprehension of how the universe is supposed to work.

But yes, I agree. For many reasons. Even just the simple fact that tabletop games tend to be quite goal-focused. Even if it is about roleplaying, you're still playing a campaign and your success can more often than not be measured. You're trying to go somewhere. And that, as a player, puts you into the mindset of "I need to win this."

Also the fact that playing a *game* about Lovecraftian horror is already really going against the point of it.

>> No.31731073

>>31731011

That's kinda like asking why soldiers coming home from the war would suffer from PTSD even if they won.

Because it's horribly fucked up and something you will feel wrong and broken about, no matter what side you're on.

>> No.31731084

>>31730983
Considering it's also a collection of short stories by Robert Chambers your claim of stupidity may have been applied to the wrong target.

>> No.31731092

>>31731052
I guess you could run a game where nothing the player characters do matter in the least, and they remain completely insignificant. It could work as a one-shot but a campaign would become frustrating quickly.

>> No.31731103

>>31731073
>>31731052
Well, there's also the fact that I was ICly given a briefing that describes how the shuggoths were created by fishpeople, not actually extradimentional, and it never even got within five feet of me before a missile blew up the entire building.

Just feels more like an action movie than horror at that point.

>> No.31731115

>>31730187
Who's afraid of fire? I mean, sure, I don't want my house burning down and all my stuff to get burned so I take precautions, but I've never met anyone AFRAID of fire. Smart enough not to touch it, but never afraid, that's silly.

>> No.31731144

>>31731115
I've known several people afraid of fire. They all had one thing in common: They had been on fire before.

>> No.31731163

>>31731092

Yeah. It's pretty much that what a good game and properly done Lovecraftian horror require are very opposed.

One is all about doing things. The other is all about how it didn't even matter if you did something, because the world is incomprehensible, and you're only getting sucked into that incomprehensible machine by coincidence now, and being crushed by its cogs doesn't actually mean anything, and the whole point was that you're too small to ever comprehend any of it.

>> No.31731178

>>31730983
What's Ambrose Bierce to do with the king in yellow: Robert W. Chambers came up with the concept of the play.

The only thing is that Robert W. Chambers' writings are fucking weird - he was writing basically post-modern surrealist literature in the 1890s. The King in Yellow play is this additional bit of slipstreamy weirdness ontop of the suicide booth and decriminalisation of suicide and the constant reference to french military titles to refer to random people. All of this in new york. In the latter half of the 19th century.

And then the protagonist starts handing out copies of the play to random passersby on the street while shouting at them about how reading the play will send them insane.

Honestly, when you read Chambers' stuff, you begin to wonder why the fuck Lovecraft threw that stuff into the mythos - usually his references are to other works of horror. It'd be like if Stephen King started throwing random references to the books mentioned in Stanislaw Lem's reviews for books that don't (and in some cases, CAN'T) exist.

>> No.31731196

>>31731103

Well, yeah. I guess that might be it. If the supernatural in the setting is (or has at least been explained to the character as) actually completely quantifiable and definable, then it's really not about the cosmic dread of an unknown, uncaring universe any more. Then it's just a case of there being something remotely nasty you didn't know about before.

It can still make you insane, but it's lot less insidious.

>> No.31731314

>>31731011
>>31731073
To be fair, it seems like something lost in translation. In the novels, we don't really see anyone driven insane the way it happens in CoC based systems like the game. People do get fucked up, because it's horrid and scary and disgusting etc. etc. but it's closer to actual mental issues, PTSD, paranoia and the like than gibbergibbergibber cryptic plothint.

>> No.31731406

>>31731314
Either that or they get their soul stolen (Hypnos)

>> No.31731422

>>31731144
I've been on fire before. I've accidentally lit my clothes on fire several times in my life, the one I remember most was when I was 3 and I set my pajama pants on fire while playing with matches. I was lucky I didn't get badly burned, polyester burns fast.
And I love fire. It's a living, breathing thing. Watching it dance and flicker, the red glow of embers and the breath of life it gets when you add new fuel, it's the most beautiful thing I've ever seen. Fire is like a child, you have to nurture it and care for it, you can't let it starve. Then again, you can't let it go out of control and hurt itself and other either. You make it too hot and it burns itself out too quickly. You let it get too cold, let it go out, and it's dead. If you can't conjure up something from the ashes your baby is lost.

>> No.31731442

>>31731422
Cultist!

>> No.31731463

>>31731442
...or Awake, depending on the game you're in.

>> No.31731476

>>31731422
Not everyone is the same, mang. I love dogs, always have, but since one nearly fucking killed me (missed a main artery by a quarter of an inch) I get automatically nervous around unfamiliar large dogs, without much conscious control over it. I still love the damn things, but that doesn't stop the reaction.

>> No.31731489

>>31731476
And dogs sense that. Puts them into an aggressive stance.

>> No.31731496

>>31731422
I think this is a little beyond Pyromania. Pyrophilia?

>> No.31731505

>>31731463
Right.

Firelord Madness Power, go.

>> No.31731533

>>31731489
I am aware of this, but since I don't actually show it, and dogs generally have better stuff to do than fuck with people (unless they are kind of fucked in the head) nothing has happened. The dog that did bite me had cancer that I did not know about, was in pain, and was scared by fireworks. I happened to be drunk at the time (New Years) and tried to comfort it a bit by reflex because it looked exactly like my old dog, also scared of fireworks. I don't blame the dog. Haven't had any trouble with dogs since, and I am perfectly fine with any I actually know and have met before.

The point is, there are multiple ways that shit gets processed, based on a fairly large number of factors, and getting scared of something after a bad experience is pretty normal.

>> No.31731637

>>31731442
Beautiful. Truly beautiful.
Some people call Fire the destroyer, and it can be, sure. But Fire is also the cleanser, the nurturer. Pine Cones, for instance. Pine Cones will not open unless it gets hot enough, like in a fire. Once a forest fire burns the old growth, cleanses the palate on the forest if you will, it allows the growth of new trees. Trees that are nurtured by the ash that fire provided from their predecessors.
Pompeii is another good example. Yes the ash killed the city, but it also preserved it! Giving us an unparalleled view into our own past, our own history. Fire and Ash can teach us much, if we only pay attention.

>> No.31731747

>>31731637
>>31731422
Does anyone else suddenly want to call their mom?

>> No.31732703

>>31731637

>> No.31732741

These all sound like shitty Holder series creepypasta.

>> No.31732817

>>31732741
We need Holders series threads again. I said so a week ago.

>> No.31733166

>>31731103
But that's kinda the main point of "At the Mountains of Madness". They analyze the artifacts of the Elder Things, they even dissect one of them. It doesn't make them less scary.

>> No.31734461

>>31730776
>Next Gen video game technology, i.e., anything more powerful than 16 bits, is powered by damned souls. Enemies are actually confused souls of the dead with elaborate electronic "masks". The Nintendo 64 is the pioneer of this technique, and is not as refined as others. If a Nintendo 64 left in a poorly ventilated area for more than two weeks, the walls will bleed.

A guy I grew up with swore up and down that this was true. I just thought he was insane, I didn't think it was actually a "thing"...

>> No.31734582

>>31730767

I thought it was about your family living somewhere a looooong time.

>> No.31734600

>>31734461
Super Nintendo an Saturn were 32 bit consoles. The 80386 was a 32 bit processor.

>> No.31734645

>>31733166

Huh? It does make them less scary. That's sort of the point, ultimately:

“Radiates, vegetables, monstrosities, star-spawn – whatever they had been, they were men!”

Ultimately despite their bizarre physiology the Elder Things were quite similar to man. Their creations the shoggoths and the things they warred against, were very much not similar to man.

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